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Proceedings The Unthinkable Doctorate (no longer available in print)

 

The conference organisation was a joint effort between the Faculty of Architecture (Campus Sint-Lucas) and NETHCA (Network for Theory and History of Architecture).The background and different conference experiences, resulted in energising discussions, which produced the wonderful format and set-up of the conference. This clearly contributed to the overall atmosphere of the ‘Unthinkable Conference’. The conference consisted of 4 different sessions and focus themes, resulting in some kind of chapters. These themes give an overall structure to this book. The idea of the structure emerged during the discussions of the Scientific Committee in order to improve on focus and content of the contributions. They were communicated to the authors before they submitted the final papers. From the submitted abstracts, it soon became clear the local context in which research and PhD programmes are developed is extremely important. History, expertise, employed paradigms are crucial to understand. Hence it was evident to create an ‘Organisation’ subsection. Secondly, in the field of Architecture and Design, ‘Media’ (another section) are essential for content and communication. Assessment and quality control are discussed in a third section on ‘Validation’. Interaction with peers, reliability are some of the issues discussed. Finally, in each of these discussions, the need emerged to give forum to a debate on epistemological issues in relation to research in design and architecture. The fields are not intended to be limitative or to strictly describe subfields, but in order to develop some focus in the debate and all contributions should be seen from the perspective of the original call for papers.

 

Click here to download the PDF-version. (available soon)

Proceedings Communicating (by) Design

We proudly present you the proceedings of the conference ‘Communicating (by) Design’, organized by the Faculty of Architecture Campus Sint-Lucas Ghent-Brussels, Belgium and Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden. This conference took place from April 15-17 2009 and can be considered as the sequel to ‘The Unthinkable Doctorate’ conference.

‘Communicating (by) Design’ focuses on current doctoral research and fundamental discussion on design-based and artistic research. The main themes of the conference were ‘Communicating Knowledge’, ‘Communicating Design’ and ‘Communicating Processes’.

A team of experts reviewed more than 120 contributed international abstracts, resulting in a relevant selection of contributions from the fields of arts, media, design, landscape and architecture.

How to order

If you would like to order a copy of the proceedings, please contact Ben Robberechts
( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). After receiving your order, an invoice will be sent with the precise price (according to destination) and bank details.
After paying (€40 - book + post within BENELUX) by bank transfer the book will be sent to you.

Reflections

Reflections is a cycle of publications presenting Sint-Lucas's developments in the fields of design, teaching and research. Up till now, six issues from the whole sequence, numbered 3, 7, 9, 13, 15 and 16 are fully devoted to the Research Training Sessions developments. A free pdf version of these Reflections can be downloaded by right-clicking the links below:

REFLECTIONS 3 ------------------- REFLECTIONS 7 ------------------- REFLECTIONS 9 ------------------- REFLECTIONS 13

You can also click the images below to read tables of contents

How to order

If you would like to order a hard copy of Reflections, please contact Ben Robberechts
( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ).

 

 

RTS Online

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Inspiration

In the field of architecture and design it can be noted that especially individual implicit knowledge is very well developed. Explicit knowledge, however, especially related to design and creative processes, is much more difficult to develop. We propose this issue for further future investigation as the interaction between explicit and implicit is crucial for the development and innovation of a discipline and/or field of enquiry” (Verbeke, 2008).